The Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News...
Are They The Worst Sports Papers in the Country? You Decide...

The News and Post are now a government-sanctioned monopoly. Because of that, readers in Colorado feared that their editorial standards would get lower. But, they needn't have worried, they can't get any lower than rock bottom! Keep watching, there are new gems from the sports "writers" daily!

Kiszla said he was through writing about baseball, and we rejoiced. However, the lure of nights of bacchanalian revelry at the World Series in return for a few badly written columns was apparently too much for the shallow drink-seeking missile, who obviously phoned this column in under the influence of something.

October 26, 2005 in the Denver Post

"Whether the roof is open or closed, the team that scores the most runs tonight will win," major-league official Bob DuPuy said at dinner time, when everybody was fresh.
"Very good point," commissioner Selig agreed.
Actually, both distinguished gentlemen were dead. (This is the classic three-strike situation, because these guys are not distinguished (1), not gentlemen (2), and certainly not dead (3). The Observer wishes he knew what Kiszla meant, but doesn't care enough to inquire.)

Same article, apparently submitted too late to proofread.

October 26, 2005 in the Denver Post

No wonder television ratings for the World Series are steadily declining toward the same audience level attracted by "Elmidate."  (We think he meant "Elimidate").

When many sensible adults around the country began walking the dog or flossing, Houston was blowing an 4-0 lead in the middle innings. (We would have said "a 4-0 lead".)
 

Kiszla said he was through writing about baseball, and we rejoiced. However, the lure of nights of bacchanalian revelry at the World Series in return for a few badly written columns was apparently too much for the shallow drink-seeking missile, who obviously phoned this column in under the influence of something.

October 26, 2005 in the Denver Post

"Whether the roof is open or closed, the team that scores the most runs tonight will win," major-league official Bob DuPuy said at dinner time, when everybody was fresh.
"Very good point," commissioner Selig agreed.
Actually, both distinguished gentlemen were dead. (This is the classic three-strike situation, because these guys are not distinguished (1), not gentlemen (2), and certainly not dead (3). The Observer wishes he knew what Kiszla meant, but doesn't care enough to inquire.)


 

There is no excuse for printing inaccurate information, no matter where it comes from.

August 4, 2005 in the Denver Post

In today’s Post Sports Section, in describing the Philadelphia Phillies victory over the Chicago Cubs, the Post printed that the winning run scored on a passed ball. The box score on the previous page, however, shows no passed balls by either side. The winning run actually scored when Jimmy Rollins of the Phils stole home after Cubs catcher Michael Barret threw the ball to third trying to pick him off. Granted, the story was a feed from the Associated Press, but you would think that someone at the Post at least checked the stories for accuracy before blindly printing them, wouldn’t you?

A later AP story described the play thusly: “A mental mistake by Michael Barrett allowed the winning run to score in the ninth inning Wednesday night, and the Cubs lost 4-3 in Philadelphia. Barrett had Jimmy Rollins trapped between third and home after Pat Burrell struck out with the bases loaded, but the catcher threw to third too soon, giving the speedy Rollins an opening to dash to the plate. Burrell swung and missed wildly on a full count for the second out, but Barrett couldn't handle the pitch cleanly and was charged with a passed ball. Rollins broke for home when the ball squirted away, then stopped about 40 feet from the plate as Barrett picked it up. But after the rushed throw to third, the return toss from Aramis Ramirez was too late.”

The corrected account also mentions a passed ball, but it obviously did not result in the winning run being scored.

Somebody lost about $50,000...

August 3, 2005 in the Denver Post, by Troy E. Renck in the "rockies notes" column
The Rockies sent $150,000 to Baltimore to complete the Byrnes deal. Red Sox president Larry Lucchino offered to pay half, which Monfort refused. (See below.)

August 1, 2005 in the Denver Post also by Troy E. Renck in article entitled: Boston reneges, burning Monfort
"We felt it was a formality," said Monfort, whose Rockies also sent about $200,000 to Baltimore to complete the Byrnes deal.

May 9, 2003 in the Denver Post by Mike Klis

"the Phillies make their only visit of the season to Coors Field for a three-game series, Friday through Sunday." (Klis, who can pack more mistakes into an inch of newsprint than anyone in history, didn't bother to check the schedule or he would have seen that it is a 4-game series, through Monday. I guess they still can't afford proofreaders at the Post. ed)

July 13, 2003 in the Denver Post by Troy Renck

"But after the Rockies' fourth consecutive victory, after they moved to within four games of the Philadelphia Phillies in the National League wild-card chase, talk centered on Preston Wilson's catch of the day, if not the season." (Troy almost never checks his facts and apparently the paper doesn't either. When this was printed, the Phillies were 4 and a half games ahead and the Rockies had actually lost ground, because the Phillies had won 5 in a row. ed)

June 6, 2003 in the Denver Post by Troy Renck

"It went unsaid, but it's worth nothing: The Rockies moved a game above .500 for the first time since May 4..." (Proof once again that Denver newspaper writers don't even bother to read their own stuff before it goes to print. ed)

March 8, 2003 in the Rocky Mountain News

"A is for Armadillo. The distance between baseball's spring training camps is measured by the number of dead armadillos along the highway. The Rockies are 14 ½ armadillos from the San Francisco Giants and the gap is widening." Bernie Lincicome in the Rocky Mountain News. (Unless there has been a dramatic change in habitat in the past couple of years, there have never been any (modern) armadillos in Arizona, or west of Texas, for that matter. ed.)

March 8, 2003 in the Rocky Mountain News

"..something the Phillies have done (appeared in the World Series) only three times - in 1915 and 1950, when they lost, and in 1980, when they won." Jack Etkin in the Rocky Mountain News. (You might want to check the record, Jack, you seem to have missed 1983 and 1993. ed.)

December 16, 2002 Denver Post recap of Basketball Game won by Arizona over Texas 73-70.

"Gardner made one of two free throws to make it 70-65 with 57 seconds remaining. Thomas' two free throws cut the lead to 70-67 with 51 seconds to go."

Gardner then drew an offensive foul on Ford and again went 1-for-2 from the line for a 70-65 lead."

(So, that last free throw by Arizona's Gardner counted as -2 for Texas. Or was it déjà vu? ed.)

October 14, 2002 Jack Etkin, Rocky Mountain News

"The Angels were initially owned by Gene Autry, who died on Oct. 2, 1991, at the age of 91.

Fregosi said Autry called him every day during the 1993 World Series when Fregosi was managing the Philadelphia Phillies and Lee Thomas, another former Angel, was Philadelphia's general manager." (Autry actually died in 1998. ed..)

June 7, 2002 Paul Newberry in the Rocky Mountain News:

"The victory kept the Reds in sole possession of finrst place in the National League."

(I guess this guy knows something about contraction that we don't. ed..)

June 7, 2002 Tracy Ringolsby  in The Rocky Mountain News:

"In summer 984 he (Larry Walker) played shortstop for Team Canada..."

(After playing for over a thousand years, no wonder he's so good. ed.)

May 25, 2002 Tracy Ringolsby  in The Rocky Mountain News:

"There is some emotion, but for the most part, you put it all side" said Bobby Estalella, according to Mr. Ringolsby. (We believe he was misquoted. ed.) 

"Since I got here, everyone has made me feel welcomed." Ringolsby misquoted Estalella again.

"Now guys are relax and playing with some confidence." Ringolsby misquotes Clint Hurdle. (Mr. Ringolsby once again reached his average of 3 misquotes per day. The team should sue him for making them all look stupid. ed.) 

May 19, 2002 Mike Klis on www.denverpost.com:

It doesn't matter if they use they're high-paid veterans, or late-developing prospects just called up from Triple-A." (This is from the web site, so they will probably delete it before you see it. ed.)

May 19, 2002 Mike Klis in The Denver Post:

"Yet, the Phillies approached him (Scott Rolen) again last week about reopening negotiations, and again Rolen turned him down."

May 14, 2002 Mike Klis on www.denverpost.com:

"It doesn't matter if they use they're high-paid veterans, or late-developing prospects just called up from Triple-A." (This is from the web site, so they will probably delete it before you see it. ed.)
 

May 13, 2002 Troy E. Renck in The Denver Post:

"Colorado's hitters, those who figure to benefit the least from the change, seem indifferent. As if it's much a humidor about nothing."  (Huh? ed.)

May 10, 2002 Troy E. Renck in The Denver Post:

"Colorado are 0-7 in one-run games, all on the road."

May 9, 2002 Troy E. Renck in The Denver Post:

"...the Rockies are storing their game baseballs this season in a humidor and temperature-controlled room..." So first, they put them in this humidor, then they put it in the room. Or does the room have humidor-control? ed.

April 19, 2002 TV can be stupid, too - again, and again, and again.

While discussing Steve Carlton's 1972 season in which he won 27 games, George Fraser said "What's really amazing is that he won 50 percent of the Phillies' games that year. They won 54 as a team!" It's amazing alright, George, but not that amazing, because the Phillies won 59 games that year. What is even more amazing, George Fraser and Drew Goodman repeated the same misstatement Saturday, April 27th when the Phillies played the Rockies in Denver. More amazing still, they had Steve Carlton as a guest on the following Sunday and asked him if that was his greatest season, when he "won 27 of the 54 games the Phillies won" that year. Even more amazing still, Carlton did not correct them! Does no one from the Rockies or KWGN listen to these guys? They may be the most boring and inane announcers in the world, but someone from their employers should be listening to them - it's their job!

April 11, 2002 Denver Post

"If we pop Johnson and Schilling, boom-boom, back-to-back, what's that going to do them?" Mike Klis

April 10, 2002 Denver Post

Following are all from Mike Klis' "It's Bennett to the rescue" article:

"If the home opener is to baseball what "Seinfeld" once meant to NBC, the second home game carries all the appeal of the half-hour economy update on CNBC." Huh?

"By the time Eusebio, Hernandez and Petrick showed what they had, but it was the least-talked about candidate, Bennett, who showed up as the Rockies' starting catcher."

"If people were going to talk bad about them on this night, they weren't going to hear it."  

April 7, 2002 Denver Post

"With two outs in the ninth, nobody on and Arizona leading by a couple touchdowns..."

"After Holmes got his Sosa, Monfort couldn't resist delivering Showalter a dig." Huh?

"Even inside the magnificently successful New York Yankees' clubhouse, the star system exits."

"In this era of multimillion contracts and incredible feats of strengths,..."

"that's why the call it acting," Troy E. Renck, Rockies Notes Column

"...who has longed dreamed of making a cameo in a movie, "I an anxious to see how it turns out."  Troy E. Renck Rockies Notes Column

"...but I wouldn't my being behind the camera." Troy E. Renck, Rockies Notes Column

August 30, 2001 Denver Post

"Phillies Likes Norton" (No, theys doesn't)

June 13, 2001 Denver Post:

"For every two-run homer by the Rockies' Todd Helton in the bottom of the first, The Mariners got solo homers in the top-half from Edgar Martinez and Boone.." Mike Klis (an alias for Mark Kiszla?)

For every single one, eh?

June 8, 2001 Denver Post

"Throughout all three periods, Roy never stopped standing stall." Mark Kiszla

Apparently St. Patrick has developed a new defensive technique, the "standing stall". ed.

 

June 8, 2001 Rocky Mountain News

"The second game today night pits local favorite..."

June 1, 2001  Rocky Mountain News (did the proofreaders quit?)

"... scored to give the Avalanche a 2-1 lead as the start of the third period." Jim Benton

"... is hitting .322 with two home runs an 22 RBI .." Tracy Ringolsby

We have to admit we were amused by this one

"Others (referring to Avalanche fans watching game 3 on TV at the Pepsi Center) were more inclined to sip beer and devour nachos, pretzels and the wurst that the Pepsi Center concession stands could offer." James B. Meadow

June 1, 2001 Denver Post

"It's difficult to follow what Bonds has done the past two weeks and not go ga-ga about the possibilities." (Oh, please. ed.) Mike "The hack" Klis

May 31, 2001 Denver Post

"They haven't see our fans yet." Attributed to Larry Robinson, Coach of the New Jersey Devils

"Now he watching from from the New Jersey Bench." Under "Avs inside"

"The problem with solo homers, though, is no one is on base." (DUH! ed.) By Mike Klis